An apple a day keeps the doctor away

7 Oct

Dickon eating a huge apple

British apples are the best in the world.  We grow over two thousand varieties with names like Worcester Pearman, Lord Lamborne, Ashmead’s Kernel, Blenhim Orange and Braddick’s Nonpareil each with a distinct texture and balance of sharp and sweet flavours that have been described as sour honey, peardrops, pineapple or aniseed.  We grow apples for cider, dessert apples, apples for pies and sauces, jellies and baking.  The classic, widely available, honeyed Cox’s Orange Pippin is a dessert apple that’s a world away from the bland Golden Delicious, both in looks and taste.  We do not prize uniformity in our apples, with many of the best British apples being a bit knobbly, a bit green, a bit red with some russeting (dull, brown marks on the surface).  But all of the best British apples are juicy, cruchy, sharp, sweet and fragrant. 

Unlike supermarket apples, many rarer varieties do not keep well, so now is the best time to try them.  Farmer’s markets are currently overflowing with new season apples as are small greengrocers and countryside honesty stalls.  The apples pictured here are from our local honey shop, which keeps bees in a Kentish orchard where they produce apple blossom honey.  A happy by-product of this industry are the buckets of rare apples they sell every October.  This week, their smallest apple is the size and shape of an egg, their largest almost as big as Dickon’s head, was crispy, sweet and very juicy.  They will have different varieties on sale every week throughout this month.

If you love apples, you should visit the National Collection at Brogdale Farm in Kent, for the largest selection of apple varieties in the UK.  From 17th October they celebrate National Apple week with tastings, cookery demonstrations, advice about growing your own trees and of course the opportunity to buy some of their delicious produce. 

And what about the title of the post?  Scientists have recently found that eating apples on a regular basis can help with asthma and other breathing problems, so it seems that there’s more than a bit of truth in the old homily after all.

apples outside honey shop

This post is part of Wanderfood Wednesday. For more travel food stories, head here.

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7 Responses to “An apple a day keeps the doctor away”

  1. jessiev 07/10/2009 at 1:05 pm #

    OH YUM. i love apples. and i don’t like grocery store apples, for the most part. we need to come visit NOW!!

  2. angelsandurchinsblog 08/10/2009 at 2:05 pm #

    Ooh, you’d love food writer Debora Robertson’s blog, Love and a Licked Spoon. http://lickedspoon.blogspot.com. Plenty of seasonal treats there.

  3. Insomniac Mummy 08/10/2009 at 2:12 pm #

    Nom nom nom nom! Mmmmm!

    That apple is ginormous!

    🙂

  4. Liz 19/10/2009 at 4:13 pm #

    Thanks so much for sending me the link, I LOVE Apple Fairs! I’m so pleased to see them spreading and getting people to try new apples and making them more aware of the orchards that are being lost. Great Post! xx

  5. An Apple A Day Keeps The Doctor Away 21/10/2009 at 12:21 pm #

    “An apple a day keeps the doctor away” And acid reflux away! I began to carry an apple everywhere I went and noticed that I only needed a slice to treat my reflux.

  6. Chris at Thinly Spread 21/10/2013 at 5:26 pm #

    I LOVE this post. I get a bit giddy about apple day and I love our local one where the apple identification guys come with their tables laid out with one of each variety, they are amazing. I’ve had ours identified and I have it on a bit of paper somewhere but I have n idea where! I shall have to take them again! Your honey shop sounds like a place I need to go. That photo of Dickon is almost too cute.

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    […] An apple a day keeps the doctor away « It's a small world after all itsasmallworldafterallfamily.wordpress.com/2009/10/07/an-apple-a-day-keeps-the-doctor-away – view page – cached British apples are the best in the world. We grow over two thousand varieties with names like Worcester Pearman, Lord Lamborne, Ashmead’s Kernel, Blenhim Orange and Braddick’s Nonpareil each… (Read more)British apples are the best in the world. We grow over two thousand varieties with names like Worcester Pearman, Lord Lamborne, Ashmead’s Kernel, Blenhim Orange and Braddick’s Nonpareil each with a distinct texture and balance of sharp and sweet flavours that have been described as sour honey, peardrops, pineapple or aniseed. We grow apples for cider, dessert apples, apples for pies and sauces, jellies and baking. The classic, widely available, honeyed Cox’s Orange Pippin is a dessert apple that’s a world away from the bland Golden Delicious, both in looks and taste. We do not prize uniformity in our apples, with many of the best British apples being a bit knobbly, a bit green, a bit red with some russeting (dull, brown marks on the surface). But all of the best British apples are juicy, cruchy, sharp, sweet and fragrant. (Read less) — From the page […]

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